A real register

On Monday, Tuesday and half of Wednesday (today), I was at the Scotland’s People centre in Edinburgh. I had a couple of main tasks I planned to do this time around. One was locating the marriage records of people who were born in Unst, and that I knew were married from census records, but they got married outside of Unst. I was able to search the database that my TNG website creates to produce a list of all those couples where I didn’t yet have a marriage date for them and I worked my way through that.

My other task was about Unst houses. I’ve written in the past about normalising the names of Unst houses, since they seem to choose a different spelling every census, and trying to locate them on the old maps. One piece of data that can sometimes help with this is the column available from the 1861 census onwards that records the “No. of Rooms with one or more Windows”. It’s not something that websites such as Ancestry and Find My Past include in their census transcriptions, but if you look at the images of the census returns in Scotland’s People then you can see all the columns.

I came across one problem with this data in the 1871 census. This column is at the far right of the page, and for Enumeration Districts 1, 2 and 3 the curve of the pages into the binding was such that the images did not show this column on all the even page numbers.

I had a chat with the supervisors at the Scotland’s People Centre and they decided that rather than put in a rescan request for all those pages, they would get the actual book out for me to look through!

Enumeration Book Cover

Example Enumeration Book Cover

I was very happy with this as you might imagine. I got to leaf through the actual 1871 Unst census return enumeration book. I was actually a bit bigger than I imagined it would be. I am so used to seeing the pages printed on A4 sheets, but the real thing is probably another 20% bigger. It was a fairly plain cover with the five Enumeration Books for Unst bound together. Each Enumeration book within the plain covered book still has it’s blue cover (rather like the 1911 cover shown here but in Landscape orientation for the pre-1911 census returns), so you are physically aware as you move from one Enumeration book to the next, and of course there are a number of blank pages at the end, which you don’t really realise when just looking at the images.

I had all my research from looking at 1871 census images ready in a table with empty boxes where I could write the missing numbers so it didn’t take too long to turn over each page and find the column. It was really tucked in there, so I was having to look sideways into the binding crease to read it, rescanning them wouldn’t have helped as it turned out.

No photography is allowed in the Scotland’s People research rooms, so I wasn’t able to take a picture of this real register book, but I won’t forget it.

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2 thoughts on “A real register

  1. Thanks again Morag. Its a great feeling looking through those old registers. I felt the same when I researched in Lerwick. The stories those documents hold – amazing. Keep posting.

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